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Can I Do Alcohol Detox Over A Long Weekend And Then Return To Work?

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Is it possible for you to detox from alcohol over a long weekend and then return to work? When you have a job you want to keep after a visit to a detox clinic, you have to proceed carefully. The last thing you need is more instability waiting for you down the road, adding stress and anxiety to the situation.

The length of time it takes to detoxify from alcohol depends on a number of factors:

  • How long you have been drinking
  • How much you have been drinking
  • If you have been using other drugs, including anti-anxiety medications
  • Your age
  • Your overall health

Risks of Trying To Detox On Your Own

People with moderate drinking problems that have not been a problem for long can quit on their own fairly easy. There are many risks associated with detoxing from alcohol at home if your drinking has been more severe. It’s not that it’s impossible to quit on your own; you just stand a higher chance of success if you check into a detox clinic.

If your drinking has been out of control or you have been on a drinking binge, detoxing at home isn’t a good idea. Some of the complications that can arise include the possibility of having seizures, hallucinations, heart palpitations and possibly even going into cardiac arrest. If your drinking has been exacerbated by anxiety and other mental disorders, delusions and hallucinations might occur as well.

The peculiar thing about addiction is its proven tendency to get worse over time. This is why it’s called a progressive illness. Each time you attempt to quit drinking and you eventually relapse, it’s harder to quit when you attempt to do it again. The withdrawal symptoms and anxiety will also get worse with each progressive attempt. Make this your last attempt.

How Long Does Alcohol Detox Take?

The good thing about alcohol is that it leaves the body fairly quickly when compared with other drugs like heroin or opioids. The problem is the withdrawal symptoms which can start anywhere from four to twelve hours after the last drink. Once withdrawals start, they get worse fairly quickly. Symptoms of withdrawal will probably be at their worst by the second day and begin to subside by the fourth or fifth day.

It’s impossible to put everyone into the same category and predict exactly how long withdrawal symptoms will last. There can be complications that are based on your age and former health problems. It also takes longer if you have been using medications in the forms of sedatives and anti-anxiety medications. The speed of your metabolism can also play a part because the alcohol has to be completely broken down before it can leave your system.

Complications and Setbacks

Complications can occur during the detox process that can cause you to stay in detox longer than you expected. Delirium tremens are common when detoxing. This is when the symptoms of withdrawal are bad enough to cause hallucinations, extreme fear, disorientation and uncontrollable shaking. These symptoms can be terrifying and, if you are not in a safe and controlled environment, you might seek to relieve your fear and anxiety by taking another drink.

Other symptoms of delirium tremens are less psychological and more life-threatening. These can include seriously high blood pressure, rapid heart beats and even seizures. It’s these symptoms that can lead to eventual cardiac arrest if steps are not taken to keep it from happening. These steps can only be taken at a detox clinic.

Things to Consider While in Detox

While you are in detox, you will soon get a better idea of how long it will take you to detox from alcohol. Once your mind has cleared a little, usually by the second day, you can ask your doctor some questions. Try to find an idea of how long your doctor plans to keep you in detox.

You and your doctor will know by the second day if there are risks of any complications during your detox period. Pay attention to how you feel as your release date gets closer and don’t be afraid to tell your doctor if you have any concerns. Don’t let your rush to return to work get in the way of a successful detox period.

If you have been having problems with anxiety, now is the time to tell your doctor. These same problems will continue if they are not dealt with at this time. One of the most common reasons for alcohol relapse is anxiety. You will no longer have the crutch of alcohol to soothe your anxiety, so other remedies for it will be necessary to support your continued sobriety. Your doctor will probably suggest further treatment options after you successfully detox.

Although returning to work as soon as possible is important, so is recovering from your alcohol abuse. It might happen that you have to stay in detox for longer than you thought. How soon you check out of detox ultimately depends on what the doctor who has been assigned to your case decides.

We hope you will choose to check into our facility to detox from alcohol. Our doctors will never try to keep you here any longer than you need to be. What we will do is make sure that the alcohol is out of your system and you’re healthy enough to return to work. We understand that you want your life to return to normal as quickly as possible.

Our professional and knowledgeable staff members are here to help you get through this crucial time of your life. If you’re ready to get started with this life-changing process, call us today at 877-497-6180. Our counselors are available 24 hours a day.

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