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Is It Safe to Use Flexeril and Alcohol?

Is It Safe to Use Flexeril and Alcohol? | Just Believe Detox

In This Article

Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) is a prescription muscle relaxer that acts in the body by blocking pain sensations sent to the brain. The medication is intended to treat musculoskeletal conditions, such as pain related to injury or spasms. Using Flexeril and alcohol together can lead to profound sedation, impaired cognition and motor function, chemical dependence, and accidental death.

For these reasons, it is not considered safe to use these two substances in combination. Doing so has the potential to lead to severe respiratory depression, overdose, injury, and death.

One of the main reasons why mixing Flexeril and alcohol is so risky is that they both depress the central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, each substance compounds the effect of the other, so a person will be more intoxicated than they would be on either one alone.

What Are Muscle Relaxers?

Muscle relaxers (spasmolytics) are prescription drugs used to relieve symptoms such as muscle spasms and pain and reduce muscle contractions related to various neurological disorders. They can improve a person’s mobility and comfort, and, for some, offer relief from insomnia that often results from these conditions.

The effects of muscle relaxers are related to the CNS depression they induce and subsequent reduction of activity in the muscles. Muscle relaxers are not a preferred remedy for treating chronic conditions, such as low-back pain, due to their potential for misuse, abuse, dependence, and side effects. Instead, they are most helpful when used for acute injuries.

Flexeril is among the most commonly abused muscle relaxers, but there are many more popular choices, including the following:

  • Baclofen (Gablofen)
  • Carisoprodol (Soma)
  • Chlorzoxazone (Lorzone)
  • Cyclobenzaprine (Amrix)
  • Dantrolene (Dantrium)
  • Metaxalone (Skelaxin)
  • Methocarbamol (Robaxin)
  • Tizanidine (Zanaflex)

Flexeril Side Effects

Side effects associated will Flexeril may vary somewhat between different dosage amounts and from person to person, but, in general, may include the following:

  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • Increased heart rate
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Impaired vision
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Drowsiness
  • Impaired cognition
  • Hypotension
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rash

The use of muscle relaxers can make it challenging for an individual to remain alert and think coherently, impairing decision-making abilities. When used as prescribed by a physician, muscle relaxers are generally considered safe and effective. However, when used in conjunction with alcohol or other drugs, they can have dangerous and sometimes life-threatening effects.

Is It Safe to Use Flexeril and Alcohol? | Just Believe Detox

Alcohol Abuse and Dependence

Alcohol initially makes many people feel more positive and social due to the boost in dopamine it causes. Unfortunately, this stimulating effect may be misleading and is only temporary. When consumed in immoderate amounts, alcohol can dramatically decrease activity in a person’s CNS and undermine their ability to function correctly.

Alcohol abuse is also associated with the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal pain
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired cognition
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Impaired vision
  • Impulsivity
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Poor decision-making
  • Memory problems
  • Sedation

Many of these effects are comparable to those associated with the use of other nervous system depressants. This similarity of effects is the primary reason it is so dangerous to mix these substances, as it may result in the amplification of CNS depression.

Why Some People Combine Flexeril and Adderall

Muscle relaxers induce feelings of relaxation and mild euphoria, effects that have motivated some people to abuse their own prescription or someone else’s. Some may also misuse these drugs as a means to self-medicate, promote sleep, or alleviate uncomfortable symptoms associated with alcohol withdrawal.

Some people unintentionally misuse Flexeril by consuming excessive alcohol without knowing the risks involved. Similarly, others may begin drinking several hours after taking the medication and effects are wearing off, unaware that the drug is still in their system and may be active.

Muscle relaxers can be potent, and consuming just one drink in combination increases the risk of dangerous interactions and complications. Still, a person may encounter even more severe risks when they intentionally abuse both drugs as an attempt to elicit more intense and pleasurable effects.

When a person deliberately sets out to abuse a drug, he or she is far more likely to take it in higher amounts or more often than prescribed. These behaviors raise the risk of dependence and overdose and other potentially harmful health consequences.

Finally, it is important to note that when a person abuses one substance, their inhibitions are reduced, and their ability to reason is thereby compromised. These conditions may make it more likely that they will abuse another substance and use it in excessive amounts. These are behaviors that tend to increase the risk of developing an addiction.

Risks of Combining Muscle Relaxers and Alcohol

The CNS depression and sedation produced by muscle relaxers can become hazardous when enhanced by other intoxicating substances, such as alcohol. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), taking muscle relaxers in combination with alcohol may lead to the following adverse reactions:

  • Drowsiness and dizziness
  • Increased risk of seizures
  • Increased risk of overdose
  • Irregular heart rate
  • Impaired memory
  • Impaired motor control
  • Slow or labored breathing
  • Unusual or erratic behavior

One of the greatest risks associated with this combination is severe motor impairment and loss of coordination and balance. This overall effect can lead to falls, especially when combined with other disorienting symptoms like dizziness and impaired vision.

Is It Safe to Use Flexeril and Alcohol? | Just Believe Detox

Injuries caused by these effects can be very severe and even life-threatening. Motor skills impairment also makes it exceptionally dangerous to drive a vehicle or operate heavy machinery. Even when the two substances are used individually, they can slow a person’s reaction time and impair cognition and decision-making abilities.

When Flexeril and alcohol are mixed, these effects may become even more severe. The profound respiratory depression caused by the combined use of these two drugs places a person at a higher risk of overdose. This is a medical emergency that requires immediate assistance.

The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) reports that nearly one in five emergency room visits related to the misuse of muscle relaxers also involved alcohol. An overdose involving Flexeril and alcohol can result in death. If you suspect that you or a loved one is experiencing an overdose, please call 911 immediately.

Treatment for Alcohol or Drug Abuse

Muscle relaxers such as Flexeril have the potential for misuse and addiction, as does alcohol. Abuse of these substances together increases a person’s risk of adverse reactions, dependence, and overdose. It is not considered safe to consume any amount of alcohol with Flexeril under any conditions.

If a person is dependent on one or both of these substances, recognizing the severity of this problem is the first step in opening the door to the possibility of recovery. Next, treatment in a specialized rehab center should be sought to reduce the likelihood of future substance abuse and minimize the risks involved. It is crucial to seek treatment for muscle relaxers and alcohol abuse to prevent further health complications and avoid life-threatening circumstances.

Just Believe Detox and Just Believe Recovery centers offer partial hospitalization and residential treatment programs comprised of evidence-based services shown to be vital for the recovery process. These services include psychotherapy, individual and family counseling, group support, health and wellness programs, experiential activities, mindfulness therapy, aftercare planning, and more.

We are committed to helping individuals reclaim their lives and free themselves from the chains of addiction for good! We encourage you to contact us today to discuss treatment options and find out how we can help!

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